GFN Home

Wide&Wise

SATURDAY 18:00 - 19:00
TEXT US TO #9870

BIGGER SMALLER PRINT

[Audio Books]Ep. 12 - A Forbidden Land: Voyages to the Corea, Part 12

A Forbidden Land: Voyages to the Corea

by Ernest Oppert

New York: G. P. Putnam’s Sons, 1880

 

Part 12

 

If this mode of surveillance had been continued, the people would have little reason to complain of a Government, which, though absolute, was careful to protect its subjects against any undue violence, oppression, or extortion. Unfortunately, the system has not lasted long, and like many other laws and measures of a similar nature, issued for the people’s welfare, it is administered now in a lax and quite different style, greatly damaging the prosperity of the country. What yet remained of the old institutions has been recently abolished by the Tai-ouen-goon (or Dae-won-goon 대원군) the Regent, who has taken possession of the reins of Government despite the people wanting the law to remain. To maintain his power he employs the services of immoral persons, prepared to carry out his orders blindly and with an utter disregard to the public interest. Mismanagement and abuses are no longer an exception but the general rule in the Dae-won-goon administration. The measures, originally established in favour of, and for the protection of the public only, are now directed against the people and against all those who are in the least suspected of showing dissatisfaction with the present rule.

 

The actual state of affairs is bad enough at present. All offices, appointments, and honours are sold by the Regent and his creatures to the highest bidder: the high officers sell justice, and rob and plunder their subordinates, while these again try to indemnify themselves by pillage and extortion. The old establishment of supervision exists still, it is true, but only by name, and for form’s sake. The wandering inspectors (Am-hang Eo-sa 암행어사) and secret agents have ceased to act in accordance with their instructions under the old laws; now their purpose is solely to profit. They prefer to conduct their business quite openly, to travel as one of the noble class, and to extort heavy bribes from all those whose interest is to have favorable accounts of their conduct and sent them to headquarters.

 

The only people in public service, who are not exposed to the same continual change of office like their colleagues, are the accountants employed in the prefectures, whose social standing is very low, belonging as they do, for the greater part to the so-called despicable castes. Owing to their keeping their places longer, they acquire a better and more intimate knowledge of the residents of the prefecture and of the localities in which they serve. The prefecture employees know how to benefit by their experience, to their own advantage as well as to that of their superiors; they exercise without exception an influence over the people out of keeping with their social rank and position.

 

Among the high officers holding appointments at court, the Kan-kwan, or judge of morality, stands in the first rank. This office, which was established in the good old times, has, like most other similar institutions, become quite ineffective, and exists only by name. This position was formerly filled by a person of advanced age, whose virtues and scholarship particularly fitted him for the position. His duty was to watch all the king’s actions, to subject him to a severe control, and to remonstrate with, and even fearlessly censure his royal master, whenever his views of right and justice did not coincide with those of the sovereign. Another court appointment is that of the To-uen-sa, which is held by a scholar who has to be particularly intimate with the classic works and the Chinese language, and that of the Suen-tsien-kuen, whose office corresponds with the charge of one of our court-marshals. His duty consists in delivering addresses to the king, in returning answers, publishing royal commands, etcetera.

 

It may be interesting to add the list of titles of the commanders of the army and navy. According to the “Tschosian Monogatari,” the Japanese recording of Joseon, the army and navy must have held appointments previously. However, hardly any of them have been filled up during the long period of peace the country has enjoyed.

comments powered by Disqus
Wide_aodLIST
NO TITLE COUNT
48 TEXT LINK 14
47 TEXT LINK 12
46 TEXT LINK 17
45 TEXT
[Audio Books]Ep. 12 - A Forbidden Land: Voyages to the Corea, Part 12
LINK
17
44 TEXT LINK 15
43 TEXT LINK 15
42 TEXT LINK 15
41 TEXT LINK 17
40 TEXT LINK 83
39 TEXT LINK 89
38 TEXT LINK 79
37 TEXT LINK 75
36 TEXT LINK 77
35 TEXT LINK 78
34 TEXT LINK 84
 맨앞이전1234

CONTACT GFN
  • TEL : +82-62-460-0987
  • FAX : +82-62-461-0987
  • EMAIL : gfn@gfn.or.kr
  • ADDRESS : 17 SA-JIK STREET NAMGU,
    GWANGJU METROPOLITAN CITY,
    KOREA REPUBLIC VIEW MAP
    (ZIPCODE 61640)
RELATION NETWORK